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Vancouver Criminal Law Blog
Acumen Law Corporation > Blog (Page 37)

Decisive action on the interlock and RDP

Torpedo on the water: interlock and RDP remedil requirements are about to be destroyed

We've been working very hard this week because now is the critical time to take decisive action on the interlock and RDP requirements that follow a 90-day Immediate Roadside Prohibition. You can read the previous posts to see what got us to where we are. Simply put, the Office of the Superintendent of Motor Vehicles took the position when the IRP scheme was introduced that if you were issued a 90-day IRP, the Responsible Driver Program (RDP) and interlock were mandatory. Of course, that's not what the law said and not what our provincial politicians voted on when the IRP law...

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Lifting the interlock requirement

Lifting the interlock requirement

We have been incredibly busy since the news last week about the Ignition Interlock and Responsible Driver Programs. We have been receiving hundreds of calls and emails. Many people are calling to share their stories, to thank us, or to ask whether we can help them. We wish we had time to talk to everyone but unfortunately there just aren’t enough hours in the day. So we send out our apologies if we have been slow getting back to you. Many who are calling us have been wondering if they too might be exempted from the Ignition Interlock and Responsible Driver Program...

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The most important tidbit from the IRP news

The OSMV now sees the light and we hope they will abide by the law

Chances are if you're reading our blog today then you've been following the news in the last few weeks. Everything has been pretty well explained in previous posts, but there is one important tidbit from the IRP news stories that you may have missed. The OSMV appears to have capitulated. In an article in the Canadian Press the deputy Superintendent of Motor Vehicles is quoted: Melvin said her office considers the driver’s five-year driving record before making a decision to refer the person to a remedial program. She said her office is also open to hearing submissions from the motorists. Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com This...

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B.C. drunk-driving laws could trigger new wave of court battles

Paul Doroshenko defence lawyer in Vancouver

The B.C. government isn’t properly following its own drunk-driving laws and should prepare to be hammered by a new wave of court challenges, says the lawyer whose legal petitions forced more than 1,110 impaired-driving penalties to be overturned. “They were obligated to apply the law, and they didn’t do it,” said Paul Doroshenko, a Vancouver lawyer whose court challenges forced the Justice Ministry to announce Friday it was overturning penalties in 1,137 cases. “The government hasn’t abided by its own law, and it’s going to end up costing taxpayers millions and millions of dollars.” The Office of the Superintendent of Motor Vehicles said...

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Impaired penalty review prompts B.C. to grant breaks to more than 1,100

More than 1,100 British Columbia motorists caught up in tougher drunk driving rules before part of the law was found unconstitutional will have some of their punishments overturned, but their drunk driving penalty still sticks. The Justice Ministry confirmed Friday at least 1,137 motorists who were required to attend and pay for driver education programs and install ignition-lock systems in their vehicles after failing roadside impaired driving tests no longer need to take those actions — and up to 400 drivers may be in line for refunds. The two programs add up to a cost of about $2,600. Last month, the Justice Ministry...

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